Tag Archives: bones

Guest Contribution : Clover – Living a Beautifully Healthy Life

One look at the supermarket shelves reveals the huge growth in alternatives to anything and everything, including milk. The secret is to let your diet lead you to an oasis of calm and health. When you are stressed out chances are your diet takes a plunge for the worse, You may eat the whole shebang, or lose your appetite altogether. No matter how you deal with it, stress affects your body in more ways than one and by eating incorrectly you could be doing yourself harm. Choose wisely what you put in your mouth and you can help your body with the war on stress.

Place antioxidant-rich foods on your grocery list – these include tomatoes, apricots, almonds, hazelnuts, mangoes, peppers, pilchards, mussels, broccoli, carrots, paw-paw and spinach.

The benefits of milk:

Milk contains the amino acid tryptophan, which is converted into vitamin B3 by the liver. It then helps raise serotonin levels, a neurotransmitter that helps the body regulate appetite, sleep patterns and mood. Because of this ability, tryptophan has been used in the treatment of a variety of conditions, most notably insomnia, depression and anxiety.

Eating smart:

Oat-enriched smoothie

If you simply cannot face a big breakfast, it might be a great idea to bulk up on your smoothie with a handful of oats.

Ingredients:

One serving:

1 banana

1 teaspoon of honey

90 ml full cream milk

125 ml plain yoghurt

½ cup raspberries

1 ½ cup rolled oats

Method:

Add all the ingredients to a blender and process until smooth. Serve immediately.

A common reason for striking cows’ milk and dairy products off the menu is having a low level of the enzyme lactase needed to digest the milk sugar, lactose. Lactose intolerance is quite common affecting at least 33% of people worldwide. Moderating your milk consumption can prove to be beneficial.

Although some experts blame cows’ milk for the increased risk of health problems, others argue that its complex mixture of nutrients has health benefits:

  • Milk is rich in calcium which is required for strong bones and teeth, and for a healthy functioning heart. A 250 ml glass of 2% low-fat cows’ milk offers 24% of the adult nutrient reference value of calcium (1300 mg a day).
  • Milk contains good fats too – Milk from grass-fed cows contain “good “unsaturated fats. Replacing the “bad” fats with the “good” fats in a diet will reduce heart-disease risk. Milk also has conjugated linoleic acid, which assists in reducing cholesterol.
  • Vitamins and minerals – Milk is full of vitamins, minerals and other biologically active health-boosting compounds.
  • Probiotics – fermented milk products that have live cultures, such as yoghurt, contain probiotics – these are linked to a range of health benefits such as an increased immune function. Try adding low-fat yoghurt to your bowl of muesli in the mornings.
  • Weight control – Full cream milk passes through the gastric tract slowly, which can help to regulate blood sugar levels and appetite.

Remember that living a beautifully healthy life is what really matters at the end of the day.

If you wish to submit an authored our anonymous guest post please feel free to contact poutperfection@gmail.com or one of columnistas directly for more information

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Filed under Food, Health, Recipes

Let Rooibos Fix You

Just like in the film My Big Fat Greek Wedding, where the older relative thinks that Windowlene will fix everything, South African’s are no different, with rooibos, but possibly with a bit more science to back up their claimrooibos bushs, rooibos will help your problems. We love drinking our rooibos tea, its benefits are widely known and even get some international recognition.

Reasons why we drink rooibos include, but are not limited to:

  1. It is a refreshing drink.
  2. It is caffeine free, which means its safe for everyone to drink including children and pregnant ladies.
  3. It has strong anti-oxidants which protect the body in a number of ways, including fighting free radicals and has very strong anti-inflammatory properties which helps prevent heart disease.
  4. There are studies that suggest consumption of rooibos tea results in a reduction of cancer causing chemicals.
  5. It is rich in minerals, like the soil it is grown in. Some of the minerals are magnesium for the immune system; calcium and manganese for healthy teeth and bones; zinc for the metabolism; and iron which is important for helping blood and muscles distribute oxygen.
  6. It can resolve tummy cramps.
  7. Protects against Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease.
  8. Encourages a restful sleep.
  9. Research suggests that drinking rooibos may assist in weight management, as part of a healthy lifestyle.
  10. It can relieve skin conditions.

So, have you added “DRINK MORE ROOIBOS” to your new years resolutions? Me neither. I don’t believe in resolutions… and I will tea regardless of whether its on a list 😛

african extracts

Toward the end of the year I received the African Extracts Rooibos Skin Care as a present which is made using rooibos which is grown in the Cederberg mountains. African Extracts is designed by South Africans for South African skin. As rooibos contains a phunylpyretic acid, which helps improve acne, psoriasis and eczema you can actually apply a cooled tea bag to affected areas on the skin for a jump start to soothe and heal any inflammation but if the thought of this sounds a bit dramatic and possibly crazy, the African Extract range is able to address your skin concerns and provide all the benefits of rooibos tea bags on a daily basis in your skin care routine. The powerful antioxidants in all the African Extract products protect you from harsh environmental stress and pollutants.

Cleansing_LotionThe soothing cleansing lotion retails for R47.00 and is just that, I used it when my skin was aggravated after being in the sun and on a game drive for a few hours and once I had finished cleansing my skin had calmed down tenfold, and felt refreshed. Continue reading

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Filed under Cruelty Free, Health, Product Review, Skin

Roadkill Couture

The fashion industry is historically pretty fond of wearing dead animals because of its legacy as a luxury material, however, designers tend to obscure the origin of the fur – few people like being reminded of all the suffering and sinew that goes into a pricey fur coat.

eatton1Conceptional artist Jess Eaton wants to address the gap between dead animals that are socially acceptable to wear and those that are not – so she made a bunch of dresses out of straight-up roadkill.

eatton2Roadkill Couture comprises of garments created out of the pelts, feathers and bones of animals that have been killed and eaten as food, have accidentally killed on our roads, that have died of natural causes or been culled as pests.

Roadkill Couture is a celebration of the exquisite design of nature and is giving a second life to things of wonder and beauty when they would normally perish or simply be thrown away or discarded.

The animals used have been found by ourselves, donated by friends, family or pest control or bought at the butcher and we have processed each and every one ourselves.

Roadkill Couture has a very strong ethical code and aboslutely no animal was, or ever will be harmed or killed for the making of the collection.

Jess Eaton’s designs will be on display at London’s White Gallery this May.

While I appreciate that Jess Eaton is asking questions that need to be asked from within the fashion industry (Kate Moss wore one of her designs in Love), but I really cannot help but feel that these look a little too much like golden era Alexander McQueen.

eatton3Unfortunately, rather than a post about the origin of our so-called luxury materials, I’ve been tempted to having a conversation about intellectual property. So back to my point…I am not pro fur, faux, real or otherwise, HOWEVER I do believe that Jess Eaton may be onto something IF one would be possessed to wear another creature but my inital reaction to this was that, it is disturbing and tragic all at the same time.

what are your thoughts?

x missfitz

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Filed under Designers, Fashion, Media, Models, News, What not to do....

Guest Contribution: Thin People are Part of the Body Image Conversation, Too

People like to make things into battles, with two opposing sides. You know, like in the Mommy Wars where breastfeeding is a battle cry and formula feeding is a ferocious counterattack. Oy vey.

hotter-than-this-meme01

Sometimes, in the world of conversations about body image, it seems like heavy women get pitted against thin women. There are a series of memes that have been endlessly cycling through Facebook with pictures of skinny, currently famous women alongside previous pinups with voluptuous breasts and hips. One caption reads “When did this … become hotter than THIS?” suggesting that our thin-obsessed culture has lost its way.

“EEWWW! She’s just skin and bones!” say the commenters. And then thin women get understandably pissed.

Let’s be real for a moment. The fat acceptance movement, though increasingly present and vocal, has a long way to go in terms of garnering mainstream support. We exist in a culture that fat-shames incessantly. No one is immune from it. We are told in millions of tiny and screamingly loud ways every day that fat is gross, horribly unhealthy, ugly, and unacceptable. Even thin girls and women often fight hard, and sometimes dangerously, to be thinner, because we have learned that thinner is always better.

I don’t think there’s a real contest here. Heavy women are discriminated against, treated cruelly, and made to feel terrible about themselves because of the way they look. Not true for thin women.

BUT.

When we talk about body image, thin women are a part of that conversation. They have to be. We ALL deal with beauty standards. We ALL face off against our own appearance expectations. And many of us, regardless of how much we weigh, think more than we’d like to admit about our weight.

And even more than this, people’s appearances don’t always tell the whole story. Actually, they rarely do. Some very thin women feel self-conscious about their bodies and wish that they were curvier. There are very heavy anorexics and very small binge eaters and people who feel completely great about the way they look even though no one else seems to think they look good. There are supermodels who feel ugly. It isn’t possible to look at someone and diagnose how they feel about their body. It’s unfair to assume that you know how they should feel.

I get heavily into debate on Facebook and Twitter about weight issues and sometimes women write to me to tell me that they agreed with everything I was saying about body image until they saw a picture of me. “You have no right to talk,” they inform me. “You’re too thin.”

I have apologized for my weight in these contexts, caught off guard and confused and upset about offending someone. But I have also struggled with my weight, harassed myself over it. I, like so many girls and women, have quietly believed in my own ugliness, and made a thousand shameful little promises that began with “I will stop eating all of the things that taste good.” Yeah. Because that usually works.

A very thin friend of mine was telling me the other day about how awkward her exchanges about weight with one of her closest friends are. “I am getting SO fat!” laments her heavier friend.

“You look amazing,” says my friend.

“Yeah, whatever,” her friend says dismissively. “YOU should talk. Look at how thin you are!”

But my friend battled an eating disorder for years. Sometimes she didn’t fight, actually. Eventually she did. Now she is working to eat more and healthily. She is working to gain weight. She is EXACTLY the person to talk, because her relationship with weight is complicated, painful, intense, and ongoing.

In fact, everyone who deals with body image issues has a right to talk about body image. Men, too, while we’re being inclusive here. We are all living and participating in a culture that has a lot to say about what is hot and what is not, and we’re affected by it. In different ways, certainly, but sometimes in ways that are more similar than we might imagine, when we come from such disparate backgrounds and have such varying appearances. They do not call South Africa the Rainbow Nation for nothing.

One of the great things about the internet and the communities it fosters is that there is plenty of room for passionate, involved subgroups. You can find support for whatever it is that you’re dealing with. You can have a space to talk about the pressure you feel to be thinner, even when you’re already thin. Even though you might not understand why you feel this way and are embarrassed and frustrated by it. And I think it’s really important to talk with other people who are dealing with the same issues you are. But I also think we need to come together to talk about beauty and body image in a larger context. And to do that, we need to stop excluding people.

We all own pieces of these struggles or realities, but no one group owns them in total.

And in my own little community where people are talking about body image, I’ve stopped apologizing for being thin. When people tell me I shouldn’t talk about body image because I “don’t weigh enough,” I respond that they’re missing the point.

hotterthanthis

I know, it’s not exactly revolutionary, but I really believe that until we can acknowledge the ways that beauty standards and expectations affect all of us, we can’t get a clear picture of what’s really going on in our culture. Until we can stop trying to tell other people’s stories for them, as in “she looks fine to me, I don’t know what she’s whining about,” or “she looks bad to me, I don’t know why she feels good about herself,” and until we can stop trying to claim body image issues exclusively and start admitting that they’re something too many of us already share, we can’t take the steps we need to give girls and women permission to feel good about how they look, right now, in their current bodies. And guess what? Those bodies look a lot of different ways. That’s the deal with bodies.

love Frustrated

This is an anonymous post submitted via one of our readers. If you wish to submit an authored our anonymous guest post please feel free to contact poutperfection@gmail.com or one of columnistas directly for more information.

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Filed under Beauty, Celebrities, Health, Weight