Tag Archives: fat

THE BRAIN SURGEON’S DIET

A belated but very happy new year to all our readers!

As all of my various newsfeeds have been filled with resolutions for the past 10 days (people obviously start with their new years resolution planning on new years eve it would seem), which results in a lot of eye rolling from not only me but everyone who is reading their resolutions, the top resolution I continually see, year in and year out would undoubtedly be to lose weight. It’s everywhere. Everyone feels somewhat food-hungover from indulging over the festive season and wants to lose it. New year, new me. Who is sick of hearing it? Well, if you aren’t and are looking at losing weight I might have a solution for you.

THE BRAIN SURGEON DIET - POUT PERFECTIONNow, I never thought I’d be able to give any advice on losing weight but the answer is simple, pick up a booknot any book though, be sure to pick up the book entitled “The Brain Surgeon’s Diet“, written by a local South African neurologist and loser of 70 kilograms, Dr. W. A. Liebenberg. As the name of the book suggests, the book contains helpful tips and tricks into training your brain to manage weight and weight loss while taking your life into your own hands to control your own body, appetite and emotions surrounding health and food and the direct link between the two.

You already have the tools you require to lose the weight, your brain – and your brain is not hard to train especially with crib notes in Dr. Liebenberg’s newly launched book. It is not a boring diet book, it has quite a unique look and has a poke at all the habits that fat people have, what they think and hide behind…. It’s real. It’s honest. It’s simple.

I believe this book and the hidden secrets it contains will be the answer for a lot of people who have suffered over the years in trying to lose weight with little to no success or to those who have lost the weight but struggle to keep it off. It is not a diet plan to follow but rather a new way of thinking, a new way of approaching food, planning meals and make weight loss uncomplicated. In a  way it is teaching you to eat with your brain, not your body.

ScienceUnlocking the science that fad diets hide, the book easily elaborates in an easy to read and understand manner you learn about the energy values of food and meal planning that makes losing weight enjoyable and easy to incorporate into your life. I think it should rather be called The Brain Surgeon’s Lifestyle, not diet as if you incorporate this method of thinking – you will never have to diet again.

The Brain Surgeon’s Diet is published by Penguin and retails for R140.00 from selected bookstores.

xo flea143

Disclaimer: This book was given to me for review purposes. this has in no way altered my view of the book in anyway.

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Filed under Books, Weight

Guest Contribution: Thin People are Part of the Body Image Conversation, Too

People like to make things into battles, with two opposing sides. You know, like in the Mommy Wars where breastfeeding is a battle cry and formula feeding is a ferocious counterattack. Oy vey.

hotter-than-this-meme01

Sometimes, in the world of conversations about body image, it seems like heavy women get pitted against thin women. There are a series of memes that have been endlessly cycling through Facebook with pictures of skinny, currently famous women alongside previous pinups with voluptuous breasts and hips. One caption reads “When did this … become hotter than THIS?” suggesting that our thin-obsessed culture has lost its way.

“EEWWW! She’s just skin and bones!” say the commenters. And then thin women get understandably pissed.

Let’s be real for a moment. The fat acceptance movement, though increasingly present and vocal, has a long way to go in terms of garnering mainstream support. We exist in a culture that fat-shames incessantly. No one is immune from it. We are told in millions of tiny and screamingly loud ways every day that fat is gross, horribly unhealthy, ugly, and unacceptable. Even thin girls and women often fight hard, and sometimes dangerously, to be thinner, because we have learned that thinner is always better.

I don’t think there’s a real contest here. Heavy women are discriminated against, treated cruelly, and made to feel terrible about themselves because of the way they look. Not true for thin women.

BUT.

When we talk about body image, thin women are a part of that conversation. They have to be. We ALL deal with beauty standards. We ALL face off against our own appearance expectations. And many of us, regardless of how much we weigh, think more than we’d like to admit about our weight.

And even more than this, people’s appearances don’t always tell the whole story. Actually, they rarely do. Some very thin women feel self-conscious about their bodies and wish that they were curvier. There are very heavy anorexics and very small binge eaters and people who feel completely great about the way they look even though no one else seems to think they look good. There are supermodels who feel ugly. It isn’t possible to look at someone and diagnose how they feel about their body. It’s unfair to assume that you know how they should feel.

I get heavily into debate on Facebook and Twitter about weight issues and sometimes women write to me to tell me that they agreed with everything I was saying about body image until they saw a picture of me. “You have no right to talk,” they inform me. “You’re too thin.”

I have apologized for my weight in these contexts, caught off guard and confused and upset about offending someone. But I have also struggled with my weight, harassed myself over it. I, like so many girls and women, have quietly believed in my own ugliness, and made a thousand shameful little promises that began with “I will stop eating all of the things that taste good.” Yeah. Because that usually works.

A very thin friend of mine was telling me the other day about how awkward her exchanges about weight with one of her closest friends are. “I am getting SO fat!” laments her heavier friend.

“You look amazing,” says my friend.

“Yeah, whatever,” her friend says dismissively. “YOU should talk. Look at how thin you are!”

But my friend battled an eating disorder for years. Sometimes she didn’t fight, actually. Eventually she did. Now she is working to eat more and healthily. She is working to gain weight. She is EXACTLY the person to talk, because her relationship with weight is complicated, painful, intense, and ongoing.

In fact, everyone who deals with body image issues has a right to talk about body image. Men, too, while we’re being inclusive here. We are all living and participating in a culture that has a lot to say about what is hot and what is not, and we’re affected by it. In different ways, certainly, but sometimes in ways that are more similar than we might imagine, when we come from such disparate backgrounds and have such varying appearances. They do not call South Africa the Rainbow Nation for nothing.

One of the great things about the internet and the communities it fosters is that there is plenty of room for passionate, involved subgroups. You can find support for whatever it is that you’re dealing with. You can have a space to talk about the pressure you feel to be thinner, even when you’re already thin. Even though you might not understand why you feel this way and are embarrassed and frustrated by it. And I think it’s really important to talk with other people who are dealing with the same issues you are. But I also think we need to come together to talk about beauty and body image in a larger context. And to do that, we need to stop excluding people.

We all own pieces of these struggles or realities, but no one group owns them in total.

And in my own little community where people are talking about body image, I’ve stopped apologizing for being thin. When people tell me I shouldn’t talk about body image because I “don’t weigh enough,” I respond that they’re missing the point.

hotterthanthis

I know, it’s not exactly revolutionary, but I really believe that until we can acknowledge the ways that beauty standards and expectations affect all of us, we can’t get a clear picture of what’s really going on in our culture. Until we can stop trying to tell other people’s stories for them, as in “she looks fine to me, I don’t know what she’s whining about,” or “she looks bad to me, I don’t know why she feels good about herself,” and until we can stop trying to claim body image issues exclusively and start admitting that they’re something too many of us already share, we can’t take the steps we need to give girls and women permission to feel good about how they look, right now, in their current bodies. And guess what? Those bodies look a lot of different ways. That’s the deal with bodies.

love Frustrated

This is an anonymous post submitted via one of our readers. If you wish to submit an authored our anonymous guest post please feel free to contact poutperfection@gmail.com or one of columnistas directly for more information.

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Filed under Beauty, Celebrities, Health, Weight

BORN THIS WAY? Yes, Insecure to the Bone

Hiya Poutlings

I’m sure by now that most of you are aware that I’ve never ever bought into this women… For example, just two weeks ago she was banging on about the media hoo-ha of her weight gain, then she posted a series of photographs of her in her underwear (of doing sit-ups around the clock for a week) accompanied a “Body Revolution” campaign urging others to embrace their bodies. The mixed message of “embrace who you are” with “look I’m thin again” doesn’t agree with me… and I really do not give a shit if she DID suffer from bulimia and/or annorexia since she was a teenager, she has a social responsibility to fufil as her target market is a young generation with young minds, and I must be honest, I don’t believe the bullshit that comes out of her mouth anyway.

So she’s gone back to parading her bod as a matter of business, because frankly, her music is not her main business…. On Friday she went for lunch and Les Pirates, Juan Les Pins in the South of France in a bikini top/bra and denim shorts – so desperate for us to see that she’s toned up again.

I do not call this a Body Revolution, to me that is simply treating your body like a piece of meat. Oh yes, she likes to wear meat too…

I question the likes Yoko Ono and Oprah Winfrey praising Draga as a role model to misaligned youth. The message I’m receiving from Gaga is: Cover your body when it doesn’t meet your perception of society’s expection, then crash diet and compulsively exercise, and walk around half naked to prove that you’ve got a hot bod again.

As I’ve always believed, and it has now been proved yet again, she was in fact BORN THIS WAY, insecure!! She needs a warning label for the under 18s.

So anyway, Draga went back to her fail safe of early 2012 injecting the “Lady” back into her look for the launch of her ironical expensive hooker scent, Fame, at Harrods this weekend. Draga arrived to her appearance in a gold horse drawn carriage. Classy.

for this occassion, Lady Gaga got her RuPaul on with full length figure-hugging black dress, massive hair, winged Winehouse eyes and baroque horror claws… what the feck?

Eleganza!

 I rest my case…

*proceeds to step off my Soapbox*

**missfitz

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Filed under Beauty, Celebrities, Daily Banter, Fashion, Models, Photography, Social Networking, Weight, WTF