Tag Archives: Magazine Editorials

Naomi Watt’s Talks About Playing Diana on the Cover of Vogue Australian

Hiya Poutlings!

First and foremost, HAPPY NEW YEAR TO OUR DEAR READERS! This is our first blog post of 2013, and I would just like to extend my biggest gratitude to our readers, a blog is nothing without its readers, and you guys are all awesome. I wish you all every day a happy one filled with all the good stuff.

Naomi Watts has is gracing the covers of the February issue of Vogue Australia, and I think this is maybe one of her loveliest pictorials ever. Now, that being said, I can’t really recall any of Naomi’s magazine editorials ever making an impression on me either way. I actually don’t think she does a lot of magazine interviews and editorials…?

naomi2

So, this is a special case, and it’s lovely. I like the floral background and I love the green Gucci gown on the cover. Beautiful.

Naomi appears on the cover for two projects – one, she’s promoting The Impossible, for which she will probably get a Best Actress Oscar Nomination, and God knows, she might even be a major contender for the award too. She’s also talking a lot about her Princess Diana film, which as this point is only called Diana.

That film doesn’t even have a UK or USA release date yet, so who knows when it will come out. Anyway, Naomi spent a big chunk of this Vogue interview talking about Diana.

And here are my favourite parts:

NAOMI ON PLAYING DIANA

“In the case of Diana, of course, there is a huge pressure to look right, to have good hair, to walk and speak like her. And I instantly thought “Oh no, I’m going to fail at that because the comparisons are going to be monumental”. I’m always interested in complicated women, in women who are full of contradictions: strength, vulnerability, success, loneliness and all those things. Diana exemplified that in major ways. She was a great mother, did a lot of things with AIDS charities and the landmines, and had an extraordinary life, but her life was filled with tragedy and, of course, ended in the most tragic way.”

NAOMI ON COMPARING HER CELEBRITY EXISTENCE TO DIANA’S

“Most of the time I go completely under the radar but I do understand a little the pressure and how awful it must have been for her. She was properly isolated because of the media attention and, as a result, paranoid. She didn’t know who to trust and that is horrible. Such a lonely idea… a horrible way to live.”

NAOMI ON THE IMPOSSIBLE

“It was definitely hard work but had it been on green screen, you wouldn’t have got the same feeling. I mean, we were in that pool, struggling to breathe. Of course, nothing to the extent to what the real people went through, but, nonetheless… I’m not even a strong swimmer. The pressure of The Impossible was huge because it is such a sensitive subject and needs to be told with a lot of truth.”

ON LIVING A NORMAL LIFE

“There is nothing that is going to stop me [living a normal life]. I won’t allow that. Sometimes we may be suddenly surrounded by 10 or 15 photographers on the school run and they just won’t get out of your face, but most of the time we’re fine and can get through it. I don’t want to be stuck in the house and send someone to fetch the children.”

ON KEEPING A WORK/LIFE BALANCE

“You know, I want be able to do normal things. You can also add to the problem if you do the secretive thing, putting up the umbrellas and all that. It creates more allure that way. I think it’s better to go out with messy hair. They might write that I look tired or old or something but they are going to pick on something regardless.”

ON TOUGH CRITISM

“I got knockback after knockback at auditions. Just before ‘Mulholland Dr.’ my agent told me I was so intense I was freaking people out. She told me I was a brilliant actor but the feedback was that I made people feel uncomfortable because I was so nervous and intense. I just sat there and blubbed. My mum was staying in LA at the time and I went to her and said: ‘I just can’t do this. I’m not cut out for it.’ She just said: ‘Don’t believe a word people say about you. Forget them.”

I’m certainly looking forward to watching Diana, aren’t you?

**missfitz

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Filed under Beauty, CANNOT WAIT FOR THIS, Celebrities, Fashion, Media, Photography

THE BLACK ISSUE : Pioneering Models of Colour

Hellooo Poutlings!

With living in South Africa, the racism card likes to be used often, because of our troubled past. Unfortunately, I do not believe this will ever go away, but what people do not realise is that it is not only South Africa that has overcome problems when it comes to racism.

Enter, the modeling industry. Diversity has never been the modeling industry’s strong card, as highlighted by Vogue Italia’s groundbreaking “Black Issue” from 2008. What was so groundbreaking was the fact that it happened at all – an international fashion magazine drawing attention to racism in its own industry.

With this in mind, I’d like to point out that before this publication, “The Black Issue“, there was a massive movement of women of colour fighting for their rights to be in the fashion industry, here are some of my favourites highlighting their stides on and off the runway.

PRINCESS ELIZABETH OF TORO – 1936

The daughter of the King of Toro, one of the four tribes that originally ruled Uganda, Elizabeth was the third black women to ever attend Cambridge University and Uganda’s first female lawyer. When England’s Princess Margaret invited her to model in a charity fashion show, Elizabeth’s modeling career took off and she graced the pages of Vogue and the cover of Harper’s Bazaar in 1969. She later moved to New York where she modeled for the legendary Irving Penn.

NAOMI SIMS – 1948 – 2009

Before there was Naomi, there was Naomi. The first black supermodel, Naomi Sims worked overtime to break into what is still a largely racist industry. Naomi officially made it when she appeared in a US national AT&T commercial, the cover of Ladies’ Home Journal and the cover of Life All in 1968.

IMAN – 1955

With her long, graceful neck and statuesque beauty, Iman looks like she was actually plucked out of a Somalian village and thrown on a runway, but in reality she was discovered by photographer Peter Beard while she was studying political science in Nairobi. Upon coming to New York in 1975, however, she happily played along with the myth that Beard had discovered her as “a teen tribeswomen tending 500 cattle and sheep in a Kenyan game preserve”. What followed is one of the greatest careers in modern fashion history : a muse for Yves Saint Laurent, Issey Miyake and Calvin Klein, an entrepreneur and the one women to tame David Bowie.

MOUNIA

Mounia was Yves Saint Laurent’s first black muse and his favourite model. She was also the first black model he used in his haute couture shows. Mounia rose to prominence following YSL’s classic Porgy & Bess show, which he designed around her and led to covers of WWD and French Elle.

DONYALE LUNA 1945 – 1979

Pegg Ann Freeman escaped the slums of Detroit, USA, for the glitz and glamour of NYC. Here as Donyale Luna, she was was exotic and intriguing whereas in Detroit she “wasn’t considered beautiful or anything.” At 6’1″ with her already striking features and ultramarine contacts, she was in high demand, becoming the first black women to cover British Vogue in 1996. Donyale lived like, partied like and dated rock stars only to eventually die like one when she overdosed in 1979.

BEVERLY JOHNSON 1952

Bev Johnson’s name will go down in history as the first black women on the cover of US Vogue in 1974, a watershed moment for models of all diversities. Bev logged over 500 covers in her career before embarking on a mildly successful acting career and starting her own line of wigs.

BILLIE BLAIR – 1946

A former nursing student from Michigan, Billie became “New York’s newest superstar model” and the “standard of female beauty” after setting Paris ablaze as one of the stars of the Battle of Versailles in 1973. She commanded $400 a day – years before Linda Evangelista wouldn’t get out of bed for less than $10,000 – though still making her one of the best paid runway models at the time.

GRACE JONES – 1948

Part supermodel, part mental patient, dart disco/New Wave/dancehall queen, Grace Jones is an enigma, wrapped in a question, wrapped in a kimono. Her distinctive style and personality are a constant source of inspiration for musicians like Rihanna and Lady Gaga to magazine editorials, who find her a favourite subject in particular… is it any wonder? That type of crazy comes along once in an androgynous moon.

PAT EVANS

Black, bald and beautiful. Pat shaved her head in the 60s as a protest against the modeling industry’s obsession with straight hair. The decision proved fortuitous for Pat, leading to appearances in Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar and perhaps, most famously, a quartlet of album covers for The Ohio Players. In 1974, Pat threw it all away when she published a scathing article in Essence magazine attacking the industry’s racism and its discrimination effectively ending her career.

PAT CLEVELAND

Pat was discovered in the subway in 1967 by fashion illustrator Antonio who admitted that he thought she was ugly, but with his help she became a dynmic and versatile force in print and on the runway. Along with Blair, Cleveland was one of the black models that entranced the French during the Battle of Versailles.

Like Sandylashxx has mentioned before, Black Most Definately is Beautiful.

*missfitz

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Filed under Celebrities, Fashion, Models

Vogue has Upset Multiple Women Rights Groups…

Domestic violence and women rights groups are up in arms over this latest cover of Vogue Hommes International, which they say provides a “disturbing image of glorifying violence against women as an act of love.”

Hi once again, Poutlings…

Four organazation leaders are so horrified by the cover which feautres Stephanie Seymour being apparently choked model Marlon Teixeira, that they have written to Conde Nast, the head honcho Si Newhouse and editiorial director Thomas Wallacedemanding the cover be yanked from New York news stands.

The four groups consisting of Sanctuary for Families, Safe Horizon, Equality Now and the New York Chapter wrote:

“Choking is not a fashion statement, and certainly not something that should be used to sell magazines.”

Do you think it should be pulled from the shelves? And should fashion editors be more careful about the social awareness of images they believe are artsy, but are actually sending out a damaging message to women everywhere?

**missfitzz

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Filed under Advertising, Celebrities, Fashion, Magazines, Media, News, Photography, Retouching, WTF