Tag Archives: skinny

Tight or Wide with G-Star RAW

A pair of jeans is not as on par as a pair of G-Stars RAW denims is. G-Star RAW have encapsulated all eras of our denims. The brand has been in existence since 1989 and have remained on point in terms of the fashion front. I would say trend is the wrong word. Possibly lifestyle of the brand has been focussed. Styles from when wide legs were fashionable to the formidable skinnies and since this is an ever changing circle in the realms of fashion they have expressed it through their wide range of styles and fits. For ladies, for gentlemen… for everyone.

Ellen von Unwerth

Ellen von Unwerth

With the help of exceptional photographer and film director Ellen von Unwerth they have brought out an incredible campaign. These images really do speak for themselves about a brand that is upbeat, not so serious about themselves but serious about fun, practicality and everyday wear.

Campaign 15-1 Image G_Star_RAW_Campaign_Spring_Summer_2015_(Branded)_1 (1) G_Star_RAW_Campaign_Spring_Summer_2015_(Branded)_3

Their message portrayed with these images is simple and beautiful.

Jeans connect us all.

A community beyond location, status, gender or age. Beyond style. Beyond fit.

The one garment we truly wear our own way.

I was invited to the Cape Town campaign launch last week but unfortunately I was unable to make it which I am super bummed about. However, G-Star RAW have launched their new collection for SS15 and its in stores from February. Go grab yours to express your style.

Find them on their website, Facebook and Twitter @GStarRAW. Now, G-Star RAW want to know – how do you wear yours? Let them know via all your social media today! With the hashtag…  #tightorwide

Mine most certainly has to be WIDE – what’s yours?

x flea143

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Filed under Advertising, Clothing, Fashion, Trends

Guest Contribution: Thin People are Part of the Body Image Conversation, Too

People like to make things into battles, with two opposing sides. You know, like in the Mommy Wars where breastfeeding is a battle cry and formula feeding is a ferocious counterattack. Oy vey.

hotter-than-this-meme01

Sometimes, in the world of conversations about body image, it seems like heavy women get pitted against thin women. There are a series of memes that have been endlessly cycling through Facebook with pictures of skinny, currently famous women alongside previous pinups with voluptuous breasts and hips. One caption reads “When did this … become hotter than THIS?” suggesting that our thin-obsessed culture has lost its way.

“EEWWW! She’s just skin and bones!” say the commenters. And then thin women get understandably pissed.

Let’s be real for a moment. The fat acceptance movement, though increasingly present and vocal, has a long way to go in terms of garnering mainstream support. We exist in a culture that fat-shames incessantly. No one is immune from it. We are told in millions of tiny and screamingly loud ways every day that fat is gross, horribly unhealthy, ugly, and unacceptable. Even thin girls and women often fight hard, and sometimes dangerously, to be thinner, because we have learned that thinner is always better.

I don’t think there’s a real contest here. Heavy women are discriminated against, treated cruelly, and made to feel terrible about themselves because of the way they look. Not true for thin women.

BUT.

When we talk about body image, thin women are a part of that conversation. They have to be. We ALL deal with beauty standards. We ALL face off against our own appearance expectations. And many of us, regardless of how much we weigh, think more than we’d like to admit about our weight.

And even more than this, people’s appearances don’t always tell the whole story. Actually, they rarely do. Some very thin women feel self-conscious about their bodies and wish that they were curvier. There are very heavy anorexics and very small binge eaters and people who feel completely great about the way they look even though no one else seems to think they look good. There are supermodels who feel ugly. It isn’t possible to look at someone and diagnose how they feel about their body. It’s unfair to assume that you know how they should feel.

I get heavily into debate on Facebook and Twitter about weight issues and sometimes women write to me to tell me that they agreed with everything I was saying about body image until they saw a picture of me. “You have no right to talk,” they inform me. “You’re too thin.”

I have apologized for my weight in these contexts, caught off guard and confused and upset about offending someone. But I have also struggled with my weight, harassed myself over it. I, like so many girls and women, have quietly believed in my own ugliness, and made a thousand shameful little promises that began with “I will stop eating all of the things that taste good.” Yeah. Because that usually works.

A very thin friend of mine was telling me the other day about how awkward her exchanges about weight with one of her closest friends are. “I am getting SO fat!” laments her heavier friend.

“You look amazing,” says my friend.

“Yeah, whatever,” her friend says dismissively. “YOU should talk. Look at how thin you are!”

But my friend battled an eating disorder for years. Sometimes she didn’t fight, actually. Eventually she did. Now she is working to eat more and healthily. She is working to gain weight. She is EXACTLY the person to talk, because her relationship with weight is complicated, painful, intense, and ongoing.

In fact, everyone who deals with body image issues has a right to talk about body image. Men, too, while we’re being inclusive here. We are all living and participating in a culture that has a lot to say about what is hot and what is not, and we’re affected by it. In different ways, certainly, but sometimes in ways that are more similar than we might imagine, when we come from such disparate backgrounds and have such varying appearances. They do not call South Africa the Rainbow Nation for nothing.

One of the great things about the internet and the communities it fosters is that there is plenty of room for passionate, involved subgroups. You can find support for whatever it is that you’re dealing with. You can have a space to talk about the pressure you feel to be thinner, even when you’re already thin. Even though you might not understand why you feel this way and are embarrassed and frustrated by it. And I think it’s really important to talk with other people who are dealing with the same issues you are. But I also think we need to come together to talk about beauty and body image in a larger context. And to do that, we need to stop excluding people.

We all own pieces of these struggles or realities, but no one group owns them in total.

And in my own little community where people are talking about body image, I’ve stopped apologizing for being thin. When people tell me I shouldn’t talk about body image because I “don’t weigh enough,” I respond that they’re missing the point.

hotterthanthis

I know, it’s not exactly revolutionary, but I really believe that until we can acknowledge the ways that beauty standards and expectations affect all of us, we can’t get a clear picture of what’s really going on in our culture. Until we can stop trying to tell other people’s stories for them, as in “she looks fine to me, I don’t know what she’s whining about,” or “she looks bad to me, I don’t know why she feels good about herself,” and until we can stop trying to claim body image issues exclusively and start admitting that they’re something too many of us already share, we can’t take the steps we need to give girls and women permission to feel good about how they look, right now, in their current bodies. And guess what? Those bodies look a lot of different ways. That’s the deal with bodies.

love Frustrated

This is an anonymous post submitted via one of our readers. If you wish to submit an authored our anonymous guest post please feel free to contact poutperfection@gmail.com or one of columnistas directly for more information.

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Filed under Beauty, Celebrities, Health, Weight

Skinny Minnie…

Hiya Poutlings

I breifly touched on this issue on our Facebook Page. The Barneys New York holiday campaign Electric Holiday featuring fashionable yet ultra skinny versions of Minnie Mouse and Daisy Duck has officially ticked off plus size models and eating disorder specialists.

DESIGNER MINNIE MOUSE

Plus sized models Robin Lawley, Lizzie Miller and Courtney Legare have joined 135,000 supporters in a Change.org campaign against skinny versions of Disney characters Minnie Mouse and Daisy Duck for the Electric Holiday campaign, which calls to cancel the holiday window display featuring 5’11” size zero versions of Disney cartoon characters. Eating disorder experts and celebrity endorsements are adding fuel to the campaign against “skinny Minnie”, saying instead of it being a light hearted campaign, it’s sending a negative message to young girls and…

DESIGNER DAISY DUCK

“there is something wrong with changing a beloved childrens characters body so it looks good in a dress that almost nobody looks good in – adding to the tremendous pressure on young girls and women to attain photoshop perfection. The problem isn’t with Minnie’s body, it’s with a dress that only looks good on a woman who is 5’11 and a size zero.”

DESIGNER GOOFY

Barneys and Disney released this joint statement countering the campaign saying…

“We are saddended that activists have repeatedly tried to disort a light hearted holiday project in order to draw media attention to themselves.”

Barneys creative director Dennis Freedman explain his reasoning about Minnie’s smaller frame…

“The standard Minnie Mouse will not look so good in a Lanvin dress. There was a real moment of silence because these characters don’t change. I said, ‘if we’re going to make this work, we have to have a 5 foot 11 Minnie,’ and they agreed. When you see Goofy, Minnie and Mickey, they are runway models.”

Coming from a fashion industry professionals perspective, this is not out of the question. If Minnie and Goofy were to star in a fashion campaign, then they should look like models who walk the runways.

While the campaign is bringing attention to important issues such as eating disorders and how the fashion industry affects body perceptions, are these versions of Disney characters viewed through a fashion lens controversial or truly light hearted?

With the complaint that high fashion skews skinny anyway, we aren’t seeing anything new here. Many fashion designers make clothing specifically for smaller sized individuals. Even Balenciaga admitted to cutting their clothing to flatter smaller sized customers only and Karl Lagerfeld stated that he believes that anorexia and the fashion industry are not related.

But the industry is slowly starting to change. Burberry is collaborating with Adele to create their first plus-sized line and Ralph Lauren used their first plus-sized model in a campaign (ironically model Robin Lawley is one of the models speaking out against “Skinny Minnie”). The creative director of Barneys did state that the traditional Minnie would not look good in a Lanvin dress, but that’s a problem with the industry. Harrods is doing a designer Disney princess themed window for the holiday season that highlights what the Disney Princesses would wear wear if they wore couture designer dresses. Is there a difference between the two? Why is the one receiving more negative press than the other? Maybe this calls for another blog post…

Now, I turn to you dear readers. What are your thoughts on BARNEYS ELECTRIC HOLIDAY VERSION OF MINNIE AND DAISY. Will our future generation of children’s body perceptions be affected by these altered versions of their Disney favourites or are they innocent interpretation from a fashion perspective?

Let me have your opinions, s’il vous plait.

*missfitz

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Filed under Advertising, Beauty, Celebrities, Clothing, Daily Banter, Fashion, Fashion Week, Girly Stuff, Media, Mistake, Models, Weight, WTF

THE 8TH ANNUAL PREGNANT BIKINI PAGEANT

Hiya Poutlings

The wonderful Miss Sandylashxx, has previously mentioned the Miss Pregnant pagent that is held… Well, my blog is about something of a similar nature…. pregancy and pageants….

In Houston Texas, this past Thursday 40 expecting mothers all in their third trimester strutted their stuff in the 8th ANNUAL PREGNANT BIKINI PAGENT.

The women in this competition are not only competing who looks the best, pregnant, in a bikini, but their are events throughout the day designed to to “test” their mommy skills too, like the nappy toss and baby change.

Here are some of the contestants!

IMPORTANT:
Now PLEASE bear in mind my opinion is based on my experience of being around pregnant women. I have never been pregnant, so this is possibly incorrect, but I have all the necessities if I wished to be so… I also never wish to be pregnant or have children of my own, so let’s just put that out there before I give you my thoughts.

I believe that I understand why these women think its a great idea  to enter such a contest, simply because generally speaking due to the change that happens to a womens body during in pregnancy CAN result in the women feeling insecure and  unattractive, especially around friends who are still skinny with their social lives and sex lives intact. So, I’m sure it’s a fun experience to be around a bunch of other girls going through the same thing.

However, bikini contents can be trashy to begin with (yes, NOT all are, but most of them are…) I have no problem with pregnant women in general, or even a pregnant mommy-to-be in a bikini on the beach… but to parade around and seek attention just before giving birth really gives me the impression that once your new baby starts to get attention you used to get (by parading around in bikinis/generally from your looks) you will start to get jealous of the attention the baby receives, instead of yourself and well, I don’t think later on in life or when you are supposed to be “bonding” with the new infant that its going to bode well emotionally with that child.

To be frank, I’m happy these women have the confidence to do this, I simply wouldn’t ever have the confidence to this normally, never mind if I happened to be pregnant. It doesn’t however mean I anyway condone this type of behaviour, my honest first reaction to seeing these pictures were: WTF A BUNCH BREEDERS, WHY ON EARTH WOULD YOU DO THIS, and WHO THE HELL IS THE FATHER OF THAT CHILD? I suppose this type of behaviour feeds the strange and weird pregnancy fetishes?

Jennifer Clay, 32 Weeks Pregnant and the Winner…

Anyway, at the end of the pageant, Jennifer Clay, who is 32 weeks pregnany was crowned the winner based on her grace, presentation, and what the judges called “it” factor. In six weeks she’ll be getting a crown of completely different kind… So um, well done to her for being beautiful, having good mothering skills (?), having the “it” factor, getting knocked up and well, winning this daft contest, I guess….

Would love to hear your thoughts… Am I the only one that thinks this is completely BIZARRE?

**missfitzz

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Filed under Contests, Hotties, Oooh la la, Pageants, Pregnancy, Weight, What not to do...., WTF